Gender Non-Conforming Characters in Popular Culture

How does gender affect your life?
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Like a Tiger
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Joined: 21 Sep 2018 11:48

Gender Non-Conforming Characters in Popular Culture

Post by Like a Tiger » 23 Sep 2018 11:57

With all the re-enforcing of traditional gender stereotypes going on right now, I thought it might be good to highlight characters we like on TV or in film or in popular fiction, who buck this trend a bit.

One of my current faves is Lou from Mr. Mercedes. So unusual not to see the classic male fantasy 'lipstick lesbian' on telly. She's also really great as a character. Also great that she's not a trendy trans-mascot for the show.

http://smartentertainmentgroup.com/blog ... -interview
Last edited by Like a Tiger on 23 Sep 2018 12:13, edited 1 time in total.

Like a Tiger
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Joined: 21 Sep 2018 11:48

Re: Gender Non-Conforming Characters in Popular Culture

Post by Like a Tiger » 23 Sep 2018 12:08

This is a social media contributor rather than a character from popular culture.

Fionne is a mtf transexual on Twitter, who acknowledges he's a biological male and opposes gender ID.
He likes wearing pretty dresses. He looks rather good in them too, unlike some of the men claiming to be women out there. Not that that's terribly relevant.

He says: "You can transition if you need to without including female/lesbian erasure, a sexist notion of a 'lady brain' and without encouraging dysphoria in children."

I thought this thread was really interesting. It has the hashtag AdultHumanMale. I hope it takes off.

https://twitter.com/FionneOrlander/stat ... 9542145024

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Bastet
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Re: Gender Non-Conforming Characters in Popular Culture

Post by Bastet » 24 Sep 2018 02:15

I'm fond of Daria Morgendorffer from the TV series Daria. She's an intelligent, snarky, complex and flawed character, which is what I like about her. Even though Daria's the protagonist, she usually doesn't act heroic. It's an old TV series long since finished, but still worth watching.
Woman is not a feeling

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Irina
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Re: Gender Non-Conforming Characters in Popular Culture

Post by Irina » 24 Sep 2018 09:36

Bastet wrote:
24 Sep 2018 02:15
I'm fond of Daria Morgendorffer from the TV series Daria. She's an intelligent, snarky, complex and flawed character, which is what I like about her. Even though Daria's the protagonist, she usually doesn't act heroic. It's an old TV series long since finished, but still worth watching.
I LOVE Daria. A very strong part of the show is her meaningful friendship with Jane. Of course, it almost went down the swanny in the latest seasons over a guy. They just had to. There was no other way to create conflict. :icon_mad: I will be pissed for the rest of my life.

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Irina
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Re: Gender Non-Conforming Characters in Popular Culture

Post by Irina » 24 Sep 2018 09:45

Big Boo in "Orange Is the New Black". Went from a stereotypical depiction of a butch to a complex character with powerful stories to tell.

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Bastet
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Re: Gender Non-Conforming Characters in Popular Culture

Post by Bastet » 23 Oct 2018 00:04

Not sure how many of you play video games, but Phi is my fave character from Virtue's Last Reward. I like her pragmatism and cool, calculating demeanor. Phi is often a jerk but still cares about people. Sometimes I think about how it's a shame she wasn't the protagonist.
Woman is not a feeling

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froggy
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Re: Gender Non-Conforming Characters in Popular Culture

Post by froggy » 19 Nov 2018 09:46

One of my favourites, even though I frequently disagree with her politically is Canada's
Chantal Hébert
https://www.thestar.com/authors.h_bert_chantal.html
Girls need many more such role models.
" Political columnist with the Toronto Star and a weekly participant on CBC's The National.
Ms. Hébert’s first book "French Kiss: Stephen Harper's Blind Date with Quebec" was published in 2007.
Her second book "The Morning After" was shortlisted for the Shaughnessy Cohen prize for political writing.

LANGUAGES SPOKEN
English, French
REPORTING FOCUS
National Politics, Quebec Politics, Ontario Politics, Public Policy, Columnist

HONOURS AND AWARDS
Honorary Degree - Concordia University (2014)
Honorary Degree - York University (2012)
Officer - Order of Canada (2012)
Winner - Hyman Solomon Award for Excellence in Public Policy Journalism (2006)"
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froggy
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Re: Gender Non-Conforming Characters in Popular Culture

Post by froggy » 19 Nov 2018 09:50

It's really important for kids to have access to non stereotypes reading.
I really used to like Nancy Drew. But I read a lot of male action books like Bob Morane and Lucky Luke.

Kids need to know that stereotypes have no business in life choices and social expectations.
They need to learn that school is more important than popularity.
And frankly, Hollywood should be declared brain rot to kids and banned!

Suffrajester
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Re: Gender Non-Conforming Characters in Popular Culture

Post by Suffrajester » 03 Dec 2018 12:14

froggy wrote:
19 Nov 2018 09:50
It's really important for kids to have access to non stereotypes reading.
I really used to like Nancy Drew. But I read a lot of male action books like Bob Morane and Lucky Luke.

Kids need to know that stereotypes have no business in life choices and social expectations.
They need to learn that school is more important than popularity.
And frankly, Hollywood should be declared brain rot to kids and banned!
I liked The Hoobs when I was a student, and I think I would've liked it as a kid. It's a Jim Henson puppet show about four aliens (called hoobs) who've come to Earth to study humans, and as they learn, the child viewer learns too. The main four are two boys and two girls, two gender conforming and two gender non-conforming. There's Tula, the girl who likes cooking and sewing; Groove, the boy who likes collecting things, eating, being rough and making a mess; Iver, the boy who's very fastidious and camp and likes tidying up and possibly has a crush on their (male) leader, though it could be interpreted as just sucking up to the boss; and Roma, the girl who rides a sort of alien motorbike, likes exercise and hangs out with an unseen human she refers to as "my friend Dorothy". There's never anything sexual or romantic, because it's a kid's show, but it's heavily implied that Roma is a lesbian, and all four of the Hoobs get along with each other and are good friends, it's never suggested that there's anything wrong with not fitting gender norms.

There was even one episode called "Girls and Boys" in which Groove and Tula have an argument over whether human girls and boys like the same things, or whether they like different things. They keep thinking they've found an example of something different - girls wear dresses, boys wear trousers - but every time, they find some counterexamples - they see a girl wearing trousers and a boy wearing a kilt or a khameez - and they're really confused! Until they meet some mixed groups of boys and girls all playing together with different toys and games, and they explain "we're all individuals, so sometimes we do like the same things, and sometimes we don't". It was a really great message I thought.

Pretty Funny
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Re: Gender Non-Conforming Characters in Popular Culture

Post by Pretty Funny » 03 Dec 2018 12:47

Tinky Winky (Teletubbies)

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